Sustainable basket metric data.

With food production at the centre of many environmental issues, Tesco and WWF have come together to make it easier for everyone to access an affordable, healthy and sustainable diet. Through the partnership we aim to halve the environmental impact of the average UK shopping basket.

Over the course of the partnership, Tesco and WWF will be working together on projects that address the impacts in each environmental area.

There are some metrics that are applicable to all products:

Climate:

  • % reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in our stores and distribution centres
  • % increase of carbon sequestered (e.g. trees, soil management)

Packaging:

  • % of Own Brand packaging that is fully reusable or recyclable
  • % of recycled content across all Own Brand plastic packaging
  • % of Own Brand plastic packaging that is effectively recycled
  • % reduction in Own Brand plastic packaging

Food waste

  • % reduction in food waste in our stores and operations

As part of our work to reduce the impact of the average UK shopping basket, Tesco and WWF will also track sales of lower impact protein sources.

View our metrics, data and progress below.

 

Marine sustainability

Marine sustainability

We need to ensure that fisheries are not overfished and other marine species are protected

   
To track this the key metric is:
   
The percentage volume of wild-caught seafood (excluding tuna) that is MSC certified
   

We are using this metric because MSC certification is a widely accepted means to assess the sustainability of seafood sourcing

- Baseline data: 91% in 2019 (data supplied by Tesco)

- Target: 100% by 2030

- Progress towards target: 0%

- Represents 2% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

 

The percentage volume of tuna from fisheries with credible sustainability certification (e.g MSC, WWF green-rated)

This metric has been selected because tuna is an iconic marine species, which faces some particular sustainability challenges. 

- Industry baseline data: none available 

- Target: 100% by 2030 

- Progress towards target: 19%

- Represents 5% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric 

We need to reduce demand on wild fish to supply a growing aquaculture industry

   

To track this the key metric is:

The average Forage Fish Dependency Ration for oil (FFDRo) of fish feed

   

FFDRo provides an indication of how many wild-caught fish are used to produce farmed fish i.e. the fish in – fish out ratio; the lower this number the better in terms of marine sustainability.  

- Industry baseline data: 1.70

- Target: less than 1 by 2030

- Progress towards target: 17%

- Represents 3% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

Agriculture

Agriculture

We must restore nature in food production, including healthier soils, more wildlife, healthier waterways, lower greenhouse gas emissions, in line with science-based targets, and minimal pollution from waste

      

To track this the key metrics are:

The average percentage of UK farmland in a robust environment scheme, such as leaf or countrywide stewardship
     

We are using this metric because there are many environmental issues at farm-level; robust farm-level environmental schemes indicate that these issues are being managed effectively. 

- Industry baseline data: circa 18%

- Target: 50% by 2030

- Progress towards target: 0%

- Represents 7% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

 

The percentage of fresh food from regions with sustainable water management
     

The most effective means to understand whether water resources are being managed sustainably is to assess their use at landscape and regional-level, not just on individual farms or sites.

- Industry baseline data: circa 14 %

- Target: 50% by 2030

- Progress towards target: 0%

- Represents 4% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

 

The percentage of key sourcing regions with a clear and credible plan to address agricultural-plastic pollution

 

This is important to measure because some food production regions rely on widespread use of plastic greenhouses and other forms of on-farm plastic, which if not managed effectively can result in soil and water pollution.

- Industry baseline data: 0%

- Target: 100% for identified regions, by 2030

- Progress towards target: 0%

- Represents 1% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

Diets

Diets

We need to ensure that animal-based proteins, in particular meat and dairy, are consumed in moderation, whilst consumption of plant-based foods and proteins is increased

   

To track this the key metrics are:

The percentage of protein sales from animal-based and plant-based sources
  

Although animal-based proteins can be part of a healthy sustainable diet, there needs to a shift towards more plant-based proteins, which typically have a much lower environmental footprint.

- Industry baseline data: Not available

- Target: 50% by 2030

- Progress towards target: 0%

- Represents 15% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

Packaging

Packaging

We need packaging materials (both their production and disposal), to have minimal impact on the environment, in particular plastics

   
To track this the key metrics are:
    
The removal of own-label packaging (units)
  

This metric is important because whichever material is used, it will have an environmental impact, so it is important to keep a focus on overall removal wherever possible.

- Industry baseline data: Not available

- Target: 50% reduction by 2025

- Progress towards target: 0% 

- Represents 2% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

 

The percentage of own-label packaging that is recyclable (by weight)
   

Packaging must be recyclable so it can have another life in the system and avoid ending up in landfill or in the environment.

- Industry baseline data: 75%

- Target: 100% by 2025

- Progress towards target: 32%

- Contributes to 4 % of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

 

The percentage of recycled content across all own-label plastic packaging

 

We have identified this metric because of the need to move to a more circular economy, so where plastics are used in packaging they should ideally come from recycled content, and not virgin material.

- Industry baseline data: 10%

- Target: 30% by 2025

- Progress towards target: 0%

- Represents 5% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

Food waste

Food waste

We need to reduce food waste through the value chain, from farm to fork

   

To track this the key metrics are:

The percentage reduction in food waste in stores and operations
 

This is important to measure because although food waste in retailers is relatively small, there needs to be greater measurement and transparency of this issue.

- Industry baseline data: Not available

- Target: 50% reduction by 2030

- Progress towards target: 18%

- Represents 4% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

   

The percentage reduction of customer food waste

Food waste in the home remains one of the biggest hotspots, especially for some popular products like bread and salad.

- Baseline data: 68.5kg per year

- Target: 50% reduction by 2030

- Progress towards target: 0%

- Represents 3% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

 

The percentage reduction of supplier operational and farm-level food waste

Food waste at food supplier sites or on farms can be significant, and one where measurement and transparency has been limited.

- Industry baseline data: Not available.

- Target: 50% reduction by 2030

- Progress towards target: 12%

- Represents 3% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

Forests

Forests

We need an end to deforestation and habitat conversion in UK supply chains

    

To track this the key metrics are:

The percentage of palm oil from importers with a credible action plan who have demonstrated clear progress towards becoming a verified zero deforestation palm oil importer
   

RSPO remains an important tool for ensuring that palm oil is from deforestation-free and sustainable sources, however to drive transformation at scale it is important to ensure that palm oil traders have no association with deforestation whatsoever; moving from clean supply chains to clean suppliers.

- Industry baseline data: 0%

- Target: 65% by 2022

- Progress towards target: 0%

- Represents 8% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

   

The percentage of South American soy from area / mass balance or verified zero deforestation areas 

We are using this metric because much of the soy that the UK imports, largely for animal feed, comes from South America, where it is a major driver of deforestation and habitat conversion. Certification credits for individual farms are important but alone are insufficient to stop this crisis, instead the entire soy producing region must have no link to illegal land clearance.

- Industry baseline data: 3%

- Target: 100% by 2025

- Progress towards target: 34%

- Represents 12% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

Climate

Climate

We need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reduce impacts on climate change, in line with 1.5 degree target

  
To track this the key metric is :
   
The percentage reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in retailer own operations
   

Retailers’ own operations, whether energy and refrigerant gas use in supermarkets or fuel use in lorries and vans, are a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions in the food system.

- Industry baseline data: Available for some retailers only

- Target: 85% reduction by 2030

- Progress towards target: 54%

- Represents 4% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

Greenhouse gas emissions from food processing and manufacturing (in line with science based targets) must be reduced


To track this the key metric is :

The percentage reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from manufactured fertiliser
  
We have selected this metric because food processing and manufacturing are a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions in the food system, especially for prepared foods such as ready meals.

- Industry baseline data: none available 

- Target: 35% reduction by 2030 

- Progress towards target: 40%

- Represents 5% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric 

We need to reduce farm-level greenhouse gas emissions associated with cattle as much as possible, to contribute to wider goals of net zero


To track this the key metric is :

The percentage reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from cattle
   

Emissions from cattle are one of the largest sources of agricultural greenhouse gas emissions

- Industry baseline data: UK milk: 1.23kg CO2e / litre (2014), 1.25kg CO2e / litre (2019)

- Target: 15% reduction 2030

- Progress towards target: 0%

- Represents 8% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

 

We need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with artificial fertiliser, whether through manufacturing or on-field application, as much as possible, to contribute to wider goals of net zero

 

To track this the key metric is:

The percentage reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from manufactured fertiliser 
   

This is important to track and reduce because the emissions from artificial fertiliser, whether from their manufacture in factories or due to sub-optimal application in fields, are one of the largest sources of agricultural greenhouse gas emissions.

- Industry baseline data: minimal available

- Target: 15% reduction by 2030

- Progress towards target: 0%

- Represents 4% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric

We need to increase the amount of agricultural land that is put into long-term carbon sequestration initiatives 

 

To track this the key metric is:

The amount of UK agricultural land in long-term carbon sequestration initiative 
   

To meet global climate change targets there needs to be more effort made to sequester and store carbon, including alternative management of agricultural land, such as planting trees or rewilding.

- Industry baseline data: 0 of 17.3 million ha of agricultural land in the UK

- Target: 6% by 2030

- Progress towards target: 0%

- Represents 4% of the overall Sustainable Basket Metric