Tesco supports ‘Lighter London' boroughs

18 Jul 2014

We are pleased to announce our support for the Mayor of London’s major new programme to tackle childhood obesity – ‘Lighter London’.

Streatham

We are pleased to announce our support for the Mayor of London’s major new programme to tackle childhood obesity – ‘Lighter London’. We will work with the two participating boroughs – Croydon and Lambeth – as they make changes to the way food is served in schools, hospitals and on the high street.

According to the latest statistics, 10.8 per cent of London’s children are already dangerously obese when they start primary school, rising to one in five by the age of 11 – the highest in obesity levels in England. Poor diet is linked to further complications later in life, ranging from Type 2 diabetes to cancer whilst the cost to health budgets has been estimated at £5 billion per year.

Tesco is one of a number of organisations which will work in partnership across the boroughs to tackle obesity issues in a coordinated way not seen before in the UK. Other organisations include the Mayor’s office, the DfE, Defra, Public Health England and the Department of Health.

Work will start from September with the two boroughs set to implement or expand a range of projects based in schools and designed to engage whole communities. The aim is to improve the quality of food available to schools and communities; increase understanding of how diet impacts on health; develop practical cookery skills; and foster a love of good food.

Andrew Yaxley, Tesco Managing Director for London and London Food Board member:

"We are pleased to pledge our commitment to these efforts and applaud the Mayor's office for addressing the issue head-on. From removing sweets at checkouts to educating hundreds of thousands of school children on food through our Farm to Fork programme, we want to play our part in helping customers and their families lead healthier lives. We look forward to working closely with these two boroughs and the Mayor's team to make a real impact."